Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM)

IMG_4840.jpg

STEM and the Australian Curriculum

STEM is addressed in the Australian Curriculum through the learning areas of Science, Technologies and Mathematics, and through general capabilities, particularly Numeracy, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability, and Critical and Creative Thinking.

Engineering is addressed in Design and Technologies through a dedicated content description at each band that focuses on engineering principles and systems. It is presented across the curriculum through Science, Digital Technologies and Mathematics. Engineering often provides a context for STEM learning.

Evidence from the project, suggests that STEM knowledge, understanding and skills seem to be strengthened when the connections between learning areas are emphasised.  They are enriched when learning areas combine to find authentic learning opportunities for students in answer to an identified problem or in the creation of a solution.

STEM and the Australian Curriculum

STEM at Rosary

Rosary School has a particular focus on preparing students with the skills that will equip and enable them to be innovative, productive, informed citizens in society and future workplace environs.

STEM is taught in an integrated way that has a specific focus depending of the year level and aspect of the Australian Curriculum that is being taught - concepts, themes and ideas.  Teachers plan inquiry tasks that require knowledge skills and problem solving.

At Rosary School, teachers have been supported in developing exciting, innovative STEM curriculum with the support of Catholic Education SA.

 

STEM at Rosary

"A STEM education does not merely impart content knowledge in these fields - it seeks to provide frameworks in which new problems can be tackled. STEM graduates cite higher order skills in research, logical thinking and quantitative analysis as the return on their degrees; alongside the qualities of creativity, openmindedness, independence and objectivity."

Chief Scientist, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Australia’s Future, September 2015